The Murals of Coit Tower - Pics of the Week

The New Deal was kind to California. At least that was my observation as we made our way through the Golden State, crossing bridges, highways, and parks all developed during the days of President Roosevelt's "Alphabet Soup." Perhaps the most memorable of these sites - not counting that International Orange bridge across the bay - were the murals which adorned the walls inside San Francisco's Coit Tower.

The murals were commissioned by the Public Works of Art Project and completed by students of the California School of Fine Arts. The artists managed to work in many symbols of protest to show solidarity with a fellow artist in New York who's piece was destroyed for including a picture of Vladimir Lenin. For example, the first picture above depicts the workers panning for gold, while their wealthy bosses - notice the suits - look on. 

We climbed the Filbert Steps to Coit Tower simply to admire the view of San Francisco, but inside we discovered one of the few unexpected finds of our trip. So if you manage to make it to the top of Telegraph Hill without having a cardiac event, be sure to step inside the tower and admire the beauty which rose from the middle of a depression. 

Enjoy Your Stay